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Barracuda Virtual Reactor System Requirements

Virtual Reactor can be used on either Linux or Windows. The following table lists minimum and recommended system requirements.

  Minimum Recommended
Operating System Recent 64-bit Linux
64-bit Windows 7, 8, or 10
64-bit CentOS 6 (RHEL 6) or higher
Windows 10 Professional 64-bit
CPU Any 64-bit Intel compatible from the last 5 years Intel Core i7-9800X (4.4 GHz, 8 cores, 16.5 MB cache) or better.  Higher clock speed, and newer Intel architecture are better.
Memory (RAM) 8 GB 2x as much as your GPU Memory. Faster is better.
Hard drive space 500 GB Boot Drive: 1 TB SSD or M.2 NVMe
Data Drives: 2 x 8 TB 7200 RPM HDDs
GPU * NVIDIA GPU required NVIDIA Titan RTX (24 GB)
NVIDIA Quadro RTX 8000 (48 GB)

We recommend running a single Barracuda calculation per GPU, so if you have more than 1 license of Barracuda, you should buy a GPU for each license
CUDA Compute Compatibility * 2.0 3.5 or higher
GPU RAM * 4 GB 24 GB or more


* - GPU requirements only apply if Virtual Reactor will be running in GPU parallel mode. The required GPU RAM is also dependent on the size of the simulation being run. A larger simulation will require more GPU RAM. 

Though Virtual Reactor simulations can be run on laptops, or lower-performance desktop machines, doing so is generally not recommended. Investing in an up-to-date calculation machine, with the fastest hardware currently available, will provide much faster calculation speeds. Additionally, since computer hardware advances in capacity and speed at such a fast pace, it is recommended to purchase updated hardware every 2 to 3 years to obtain the fastest performance.

Virtual Reactor can be installed on compute nodes of a cluster. However, it will not take advantage of the multi-node parallel computing capabilities of the cluster. Each Virtual Reactor simulation utilizes a single CPU core, and parallelization is available solely through the use of an NVIDIA GPU. Since each individual node of a cluster is not usually optimized for the fastest possible single-core CPU performance, it is often the case that running Virtual Reactor on a cluster node will not give the best possible calculation speed. Instead, it is generally better to purchase a very fast single-CPU standalone calculation machine on which to run Virtual Reactor. This standalone machine will outperform a cluster node in the majority of cases, for the purpose of running Virtual Reactor.